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Jamboree Today Archive

Stories from Previous Scout Jamborees

The official song of the 2011 World Scout Jamboree, "Changing the World," has been introduced. Daniel Lemma and Pär Klang wrote the lyrics along with the rest of the jamboree band consisting of John Söderdahl, Lennie Hansen, Anni Söderdahl, Johan Olsson, Martin Nobel och Anton Berg.

Hundreds of hectares of Swedish countryside outside Rinkaby will host 35,000 Scouts from around the world during the 2011 World Scout Jamboree. The event will be hosted in Rinkaby, Sweden, in July and August next year.

The 2010 National Scout Jamboree is drawing to a close. Tens of thousands of Scouts and Scouters representing every state and twenty nine nations have come together to become friends, share adventures, and affirm their shared sense of values while celebrating the centennial anniversary of Scouting in the United States. Now, as they depart, there is an opportunity to reflect.

“A Scout is reverent,” says the final point of the Scout Law.

Throughout its history, the Boy Scouts of America has always taught that reverence is an important principle, but the organization does not give strong guidance on how exactly to be reverent.

At the jamboree, worship services were conducted for over a dozen mainline spiritual and religious faiths. Quakers and Protestants, Catholics and Buddhists, they all shared something in common at this jamboree. They were joined together to celebrate their own faiths, to find meaning in their lives, and to seek guidance for themselves.

Soon, 45,000 Scouts and Scouters will make their way home from the 2010 National Scout Jamboree. In days, Fort A.P. Hill in Virginia will shrink from a population of tens of thousands to a population of tens of tens.

Where there was once a fully functional city with food services, hospitals, a bus system, and a mall (of merit badges) there will be empty fields and a forest of trees.

If they do it right, no one will know they were there. The place will be clean as can be, keeping with the penultimate point of the Scout Law.

The Boy Scouts of America teaches the principles of Leave No Trace, which admonishes Scouts to always leave their campsites and hiking trails better than they found them. “Take only pictures, leave only footprints,” is often used to describe the practice. The specific principles are:

For months, tens of thousands of young men in all fifty states and twenty-nine countries have been preparing to attend the 2010 National Scout Jamboree at Fort A.P. Hill, Virginia. The Boy Scouts of America is celebrating one hundred years, and the jamboree has been its pinnacle event.

None of this would be happening were it not for a simple act of kindness. One young Scout, in 1907, helped one lost business man lost in the fog of London. William D. Boyce, the lost American traveler, was so impressed that he learned about the Scout’s organization and brought it to America.

Without that one act of kindness, the Boy Scouts of America would never have been founded, and likely neither would the Girl Scouts of the United States. Millions of young men and women would have missed the opportunities for leadership development, life skills training, and lessons in how to work with others.