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Jamboree Today Archive

Stories from Previous Scout Jamborees

{rokbox title=|Lars 'Longstreet Lars' Lifrak broadcasts from the QBSA studio at the 2010 National Scout Jamboree at Fort A.P. Hill, Va., Saturday. (Photo by Greg Crenshaw)| float=|right|}images/stories/2010/0727/qbsa.jpg{/rokbox}The Official 2010 National Jamboree radio station QBSA is on the air. Radio station 102.9 is running 24 hours a day with music, news, weather and announcements. Beginning Tuesday, Scouts can sign up for a 15-minute time slot to send their voices, and music selections, across the jamboree’s airwaves and beyond.

“It’s almost like a window into the jamboree,” said Michael J. Thorp, of Flint, Mich., chairman of QBSA.

An on-air shot on QBSA can lead to even broader horizons.

“When I was here five years ago [as a Scout],” said first-time QBSA staffer Matthew Phifer of Easton, Pa., “I had my 15 minutes of fame on the radio. Afterward, someone told me I should be on staff next time, so here I am.”

Phifer is attending college in Syracuse, N.Y., and majoring in broadcasting and political science. “I just want to help the Scouts during their shows,” said Phifer.

Although the station is for Scouts and Scouters, “people from the outside get to listen in and experience their part of the jamboree,” said Thorp. The signal reaches 40-50 miles away so anyone can tune into the radio broadcasts from the jamboree. And the reach is global because, for the first time, QBSA is online streaming to a worldwide audience.

Throughout the day, QBSA staff has giveaways, holds dance parties and plays interactive songs such as The Village People’s “YMCA.”

The setup at QBSA along Thomas Road consists of three different studios. The main studio is inside the office trailer. The highly visible “big blue studio” is for Scout DJs and guests. The third studio is in the production trailer where they prerecord special announcements.

[blockquote class="alignleft"]I had my 15 minutes of fame on the radio. Afterward, someone told me I should be on staff next time, so here I am.[/blockquote]

The morning show runs from 5:30 to 9 A.M. After that, Scouts take the air. The number of slots is limited, so budding DJs should sign up immediately at QBSA. A 10-minute training session prepares Scouts to work all the knobs, sliders and buttons they need to have a successful show.
 
Scouts pick three songs and, to fill up the extra time, they can choose to report the weather, news or anything interesting to them.

Scouts get a digital recording of their show to play at home. “It’s almost like a commercial for Scouting,” Thorp said. “Scouts will go home and play their CD for their friends and family and show them the fun they had.”

QBSA is already creating an appreciative audience. John Alexander, of Gallup, N.M., works with security and enjoys listening to the music. “It appeals to the youth, and it reminds me of when I was younger.”

Matt Lee, from Indianapolis, Ind., is also a first time QBSA staff member. “Creativity, insanity and enthusiasm” make for a good DJ, he said.

At 5 P.M., the QBSA professionals take control of the airwaves for the evening show. This includes a variety of guests from the Order of the Arrow, Venturing and other program areas. After 11 P.M., QBSA staff replays the shows from earlier in the day until the morning show begins at 5:30 A.M.

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